The best and easiest ice cream ever

strawberry ice creamThis recipe came from my sister-in-law and like most of the recipes we use in this house, it is quick, easy and adaptable. For the basic ice cream you will need:

Half a pint of double cream

400g tin of condensed (sticky) milk

Whip the cream until it forms stiff peaks. Be careful that you don’t over whip the cream as it can turn to butter in the blink of an eye. Fold the condensed milk into the cream and freeze.

That is it. No churning or mixing. Just freeze.

Now, the fun thing about this recipe is that you can flavour it in so many ways. My sister-in-law usually adds crushed crunchy bars to her ice cream so that was one of the first additions we tried. The combination of smooth ice cream and sweet, crispy, toasted sugar is delicious. Here are some of the other variations we have tried.

Chopped up After Eight mints (a bit like eating the mint Vienetta of my 80’s youth)

Chopped caramel bars (not so good – the caramel is too sticky).

Rum and raisin. The raisins were soaked in warm rum first and then folded in. Delicious.

Lemon curd. I think The Husband mixed some lemon curd right into the cream and he also  added some lemon ‘ripples’. Also delicious

Strawberry jam. As lemon, above and just as successful.

You can also adapt this recipe to use up excess fruit. For example, I’ve harvested over 15kg of strawberries in the last two weeks. We’ve been enjoying eating them on breakfast cereal, with clotted cream and scones and in smoothies but mainly, I’ve been making jam. However, one of my batches of jam never quite made it to the setting stage so I sieved it using my new/old vintage Kenwood mouli attachment and used it in a batch of ice cream. You could get a similar effect by using fresh strawberries. In fact, I used this recipe a few years ago and it was very good. It’s the same basic recipe as I got from my sister-in-law.

If I ever get around to picking the many gooseberries in our allotment I may try that variation too.

I hope you enjoy experimenting with this recipe. It’s not exactly healthy, but you only need a little bit of it for a very indulgent treat.

P.S. It’s too good for children.

 

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Playing Gooseberry

It took me the best part of a day, on and off, to get all my gooseberries washed, topped and tailed. I would have like to have processed them all straight away but the majority of them have gone in the freezer for now. Lets hope that I get around to doing something with them sooner rather than later because I still have soft fruit in there from last year.

For some reason, I’ve got a bit of an obsession with Kilner jars. Maybe it’s the fact that they are ‘old’ technology. I don’t have that many: four medium ones and two larger ones. Most of the time I prefer to make my preserves in recycled glass jars because I like to give them away as gifts and I couldn’t bear to part with a Kilner jar. However, for the purposes of preserving fruit by bottling, rather than jamming, a Kilner jar or a Le Parfait jar is essential.

I haven’t done much bottling but it’s a process that appeals to me. Again, I can only think that it is it’s old fashioned-ness that I like. If you had no electricity you could preserve fruit like this with a suitably big pan and a stove. I chose to use the oven method this time though. Most of the people that I have quizzed about it can remember their own mothers bottling fruit. Women from my grandmothers generation didn’t have fridges when they first set up home during World War II, never mind freezers.

My only foray into bottling so far was when I preserved some homemade passata. We had a glut of tomatoes that year. I’ve since wondered whether you can preserve home made soups in a similar way and if not, why not?

Since that one and only attempt, I’ve been on the lookout for a likely bottling project. Gooseberries seemed to be ideal and I had the brainwave of using some of my elderflower cordial as the liquid in which they are cooked. According to my books, you can preserve fruit in plain water but it will obviously taste better in syrup. I diluted my cordial one to one with water as that seemed to give about the same concentration of sugar as the books used in a ‘heavy’ syrup.

As you can see in my (poor) photos, the bottling process made the fruit shrink quite a bit and rise to the top of the jar. These photos were taken as soon as the jars came out of the oven and, after a bit of a shake, it has spread out a bit more now. As yet, we haven’t taste tested the results. Bottled fruits seem to cry out to be stored until the depths of winter. There’s not much point in preserving them one week and eating them the next, especially when there are so many other fresh summer fruits around.

My next gooseberry experiment was ice cream. Last year I made this from the River Cottage Year by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall (the link is to a Guardian article but it is the same recipe). It was deliciously creamy and delicate and I will definitely be making some more. However, I decided to try this, different recipe that had a large quantity of greek yoghurt in it, since I had a pot slowly going off in the fridge.

 

I have never used an ice cream maker before and I think I will have to play with it a bit more before I pass judgement. The ice cream itself turned out well, though it is very hard and needs a good half hour in the fridge before it can be served easily. I deliberately made it quite tangy and we ate it with a dollop of gooseberry jam. I also served it with these little beauties, which were a nice complement.

 

I’m sure there is going to be much more gooseberry experimentation, since I picked another kilo on Saturday! Watch this space.

Sorry about the very small final picture – I can’t work out why it won’t upload any bigger.