Allotment Glut – Strawberry Time

My first strawberry of the summer.

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It’s never long before I have more strawberries than I can easily cope with. In the last week I have picked about 6kg from our badly overgrown strawberry patch. They grow despite me, not because of me.

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I have no idea what variety they are but they don’t keep very well and actually, they don’t have the best flavour when eaten ‘raw’. They make good jam though and I have some steeping in sugar ready to make strawberry conserve later today.

Last week while the country was enjoying a 30C heatwave was NOT the time for making jam. Instead I decided to go back to a recipe I haven’t made for a very long time – Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s strawberry granita. Since I bought a mouli attachment for my Kenwood mixer this recipe has become even easier – no more pressing all the fruit through a sieve. Last time I made this I did as the recipe suggested and froze it all together, serving it by scraping it into piles of red crystals with a fork. That got a bit tedious after a while though so this time I froze the mixture into ice lolly moulds and the first batch has disappeared already.

Here is what to do. Mash and sieve (or put in your mouli) 1kg of hulled strawberries. Mix in 200g of icing sugar and the juice of a lemon. That’s it. Just freeze the mixture in whichever way you prefer.

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Of course, you then have the challenge of getting the lollies OUT of the moulds. I’ve been dipping mine, briefly, into a cup of boiling water and then squashing them gently. That seems to have worked.

Today I made a second batch of this mixture. Despite buying a second set of lolly moulds I still had a bit of strawberry juice left over.

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It made an awesome milkshake. Just what the doctor ordered for my littlest person who is at home with a raging temperature. Since strawberries are very high in vitamin C it might just help to fight off whatever virus is bugging him.

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What to do with pumpkins – chutney

pumpkins glowing in autumn lightI don’t really want to harvest all my pumpkins too soon, I want to have a few left for Halloween but they are ripening up thick and fast in this warm, early autumn weather. I roasted most of the last one and made some soup (based on this one but with added lentils) but quite a lot of that is still in the freezer.

inside a pumpkin

The second of our eight fruits came home at the weekend and it was about the same size as the first – 7kg! Time to make some chutney.

It’s two years since we had a major chutney making session. I don’t know how many jars we made but we’ve been eating my favourite dark, sticky rhubarb chutney ever since. I’ve adapted the recipe to use up some of my pumpkin. It seems to have worked well but I can’t promise that it is perfect because you can’t really test a chutney until it’s matured for  month or two.

The most time consuming part of making chutney is the chopping up. It can’t really be avoided though and unless you particularly want chunky chutney, you have to spend the time finely dicing your fruit and vegetables. The pumpkin seems to hold it’s shape surprisingly well, considering how easy it is to mash when it is steamed. The picture below is the ‘before’.

pumpkin chutney before

Ingredients

450g Dark Brown Sugar

1kg of finely diced pumpkin. This is the weight after it has been peeled and chopped

450g chopped cooking apples

450g sultanas

450g finely diced onion

2 lemons – remove the zest and chop, remove the pips then finely chop the rest of the lemon

25g ground ginger

25g salt

1/2 teaspoon pepper

700ml white wine or cider vinegar.

Put all the ingredients into a large preserving pan and heat gently. Continue to cook, allowing the mixture to bubble gently until the liquid has reduced significantly. This will take a couple of hours but you shouldn’t need to give it a lot of attention, just the occasional stir to make sure that nothing is sticking.

To test whether the chutney is done, draw a wooden spoon across the bottom of the pan. If the mixture stays parted for a few seconds and you can see the base, it has probably reduced enough. The picture below is the ‘after’ picture. It’s not particularly attractive but it does taste good.

When the chutney is almost done, prepare your jars. I always use recycled glass jars which I wash well, stand upright in a roasting tin and put in the oven for about 15 minutes at just over 100C to sterilise them. I also wash the lids, checking that none of them are damaged and then stand them in a pan of boiling water.

Fill the hot jars with the warm chutney using a jam funnel, taking care not to get burned!

bottling chutney with funnel

And if you’ve still got lots of pumpkin left, roast some more and make spiced coconut and pumpkin stew.

pumpkin stew